OLD ORLEANS JULEP

I submitted this cocktail to the judging for the official cocktail of Tales of the Cocktail 2009.

They didn’t leave a lot of official room to differentiate the Juleps. Spirit, sweetener, Mint…and something else.

In the spirit of the Julep I wanted this cocktail to maintain the old tyme lineage for sweetening up your spirits and medicine.

This Julep uses cognac as the base spirit…the only spirit.

I used azucar moreno for a subtle lift in flavor in the sweetener.

I wanted to get some other southern flavors and thought about medicinal things surrounding root beer and “erva mate”.

I decided to use wintergreen extract…a main ingredient in root beer…and Matte Leao, Brasilian style mate. It is a robust smokey flavored tea. perfect for this drink.

I didn’t want it to be root beer julep..but I wanted the subtle tones of root beer and iced tea. Southern flavors.

I think it works

3 oz PIERRE FERRAND AMBRE COGNAC
2 oz SIMPLE SYRUP of AZUCAR MORENA (unrefined cane sugar) or LIGHT BROWN SUGAR
12 MINT LEAVES
1.5 oz ERVA MATE BRAZILIAN STYLE (MATTE LEAO) or LUZIANNE ICED TEA BREWED TRIPLE STRENGTH
3 DROPPERS OF WINTERGREEN EXTRACT

Directions: Muddle mint and syrup in mixing glass. Add all other ingredients and stir with bar spoon. Add cubed ice to shaker. Add all ingredients and stir briefly to chill.

Strain into 14 oz Zombie glass and add cracked ice to top of glass. Garnish with fresh mint sprig, lemon wheel and long straw.

Matte or tea must be made strong to get maximum flavor in a small quantity. Matte has very strong smoky flavors that are excellent in this drink. It is readily available at many Latino markets and all Brasilian stores.

Wintergreen extract or tincture is available at most apothecaries and many health food stores. It is also very simple to make in large quantities. 1 part by volume dry wintergreen to two parts Grain alcohol (Everclear).

The wintergreen and Matte give this a drink subtle tones and nuances of old time root beer. It also blends well with the vanillas of the cognac and the fresh mint and caramels of the syrup.

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